Whether you’re punishing the pro-line or gliding down the greens, buying a new snowboard can be a daunting process. As you’ve probably already seen, there are hundreds of boards on the market, so which one do you choose? Well, lets start with couple of questions. Firstly, what level are you riding at? Secondly, where do you want to ride your new board?


Distinguishing what level you are riding at is paramount when buying a new snowboard. Its important to be honest with yourself, because the last thing you want is a snowboard that you aren’t happy with or a snowboard you can’t perform on.

Beginner
You’ve spent a few weeks on the slopes, you’re feeling comfortable in your turns on the beginner slopes, but now you’re ready to ditch that rental board and hit some steeper groomers.
Intermediate
You’ve mastered your turns on all the slopes; you’ve dipped your toes into a little bit of freestyle and switch riding, and now you’re ready for a board that can help you progress further.
Advanced
You’re destroying the down-rails, and floating through the fresh stuff. You’re ready for a specific board that’s going to support you while you shred down the mountain.
Once you’ve figured out what level you are, its important to remember where you’re going to be riding the board. Most boards are designed for specific purposes, so it’s imperative that you buy the right board for your style of riding.
Board Size Guide
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When sizing up a snowboard, people will often say that a board between your collarbone and nose is the perfect size, which isn't necessarily true. Now you've figured out what you’re going to be using your board for, you can determine what size you'll want. If you're going to be spending more time in the park, you'll want a board that'll spin faster than the Tasmanian devil, so go for something shorter. If you're going to be spending more time in the powder, you'll want something that has more surface area to help that float in the fresh stuff.

Snowboard size guide

Rider Height (in) Rider Height (cm) Rider Weight (lb) Snowboard Size (cm)
4'10' 147 110 - 120 128 - 136
5 152 115 - 130 133 - 141
5'2' 158 125 - 135 139 - 147
5'4' 163 135 - 145 144 - 152
5'6' 168 140 - 155 149 - 157
5'8' 173 150 - 165 154 - 162
5'10' 178 160 - 175 159 - 167
6 183 170 - 185 160+
6'2' 188 180 - 195 160+
6'4' 193 190 - 205 160+
Once you’ve figured out what level you are, its important to remember where you’re going to be riding the board. Most boards are designed for specific purposes, so it’s imperative that you buy the right board for your style of riding.
All Mountain snowboards
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You’re a jack of all slopes and soon to be a master of the mountain. All mountain boards do exactly what they say on the tin, they’ll take you anywhere. They are often described as a hybrid between freeride and freestyle boards, and often adopt many of the characteristics of freeride boards, with directional shapes, set back stances and stiffer cores to give you a board that will take you anywhere on the mountain without being too specific to one area.

COMMON ALL MOUNTAIN SHAPES

Freeride snowboards
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You love trekking for tantalizing tree lines and getting waist-deep in that fluffy stuff. Freeride boards tend to be extremely stiff so they can handle high speeds and big gouging carves. These boards usually have a wider nose than tail to promote extra float in deep powder, and also have the bindings set more towards the tail of the board for ease of control at high speeds.

Freeride snowboards

Freestyle snowboards
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You love tweaking out those tail grabs, and cruising over the kickers. Freestyle boards are versatile and built for fun. They often feature a centered stance and true twin shape, helping the rider when riding the board both regular and switch. Freestyle boards are often stiffer than your average jib/street board to encourage bigger pop when hitting kickers, however softer than a freeride or all mountain board to offer more support when landing kickers. These characteristics also make the board brilliant for beginner or intermediate snowboarders, as they are easy to progress on.

Freestyle Snowboards

Jib / Street snowboards
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If you love grinding, buttering and bonking your way down the mountain then a jibbing board is the one for you. Jib boards tend to be shorter and feature a true twin shape with a centered stance, this helps the rider when spinning and riding switch. These boards also tend to be a lot softer and more flexible than other shapes, making them more forgiving when landing on and off of rails. Lots of jib boards feature specialist technologies such a raised or durable edges to avoid hang-ups and edge catches when riding man-made obstacles. When riding, these boards feel loose, therefore at high speeds are often hard to control.

Jib / Street snowboards

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